Tag Archives: Anzac Day

My family’s Anzac Story – Part 3

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Tomorrow’s Anzac Day is a special one for my family. Tomorrow we remember and say thank you to my great grand father.

His name was Alexander Menzies Kippen. He left Brisbane as part of the 9th infantry battalion in September 1914.

He landed as part of the first wave of soldiers at Gallipoli. He survived. He survived the boat trip, the landing, the run up the beach, the digging of trenches and the below ground life that followed. He lived through the fear, the sweat, the grief of loss and managed to return home to build a life.

For that service, I am thankful. For Australia, I am thankful. I am grateful to the Turkish people for welcoming Australians (descendants of the Anzacs amount them) to their beautiful country in peace.

My mother has been on the Gallipoli peninsula and surrounds the last week. Isn’t it fabulous that Australians can go and pay their respects to soldiers of both sides of the Gallipoli conflict by travelling in safety and peace.

Tomorrow, on Anzac Day, I’ll have miniature replicas of my great grandfather’s medals on my jacket. To say thank you. You are not forgotten.

“They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.”

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My family’s Anzac story- Part 1

Poppa's jungle hammock

In the week leading up to this year’s Anzac Day commemorations, I am sharing some of my family’s story. I will be one person in a crowd at a service this Saturday, crying beneath their sunglasses, like many others. I grieve every Anzac Day and miss my grandparents, but I am grateful for the freedoms we are granted because of their sacrifice. Even if you are against Australia’s current campaigns, I ask you to look around at our beautiful country and be grateful.

This is my Poppa’s jungle hammock he carried throughout WW2. He was awarded the mIlitary Medal. The citation reads, ‘This NCO has given consistent proof of his gallantry and devotion to duty during the New Guinea Campaign. During the BUNA action Sgt Dyne was commanding a section when his Pl [platoon] Cmd [commander] and senior NCO’s became casualties; he took over command of the Pl and displayed great leadership in moving the Pl forward under heavy fire to a position from where he was able to bring fire to bear on the enemies’ flank; although the platoon suffered heavy casualties he refused to withdraw – his action played an important part in that phase of the battle. During the SOPUTA action Dyne again took over command of 13 Platoon when his Pl Comd was killed; in this action and again at SANANANDA he displayed great personal courage: his leadership, initiative and energy had a marked effect upon all those under his command.’. Suffering from malaria throughout his service, Sergeant Dyne continued to serve with the 2/12th Battalion in its campaigns in Papua New Guinea and Borneo. Sergeant Dyne received his discharge on 27 November 1945.